Entrepreneurs

How to Design Your Website to Improve Your Sales Conversions

You did all the right things. You put together a nice-looking website, you have great-looking photos and you wrote clean sales copy. But yet, your sales conversions aren’t where you would like them to be. Sound familiar?

Many business owners struggle with this same issue. While there are several things that you can do to improve your conversion rate, there is usually a missing element that a lot of people gloss over. The user experience (UX).

The million-dollar question is How easy or difficult is it to become a customer of yours?

If your answer includes clicking on a button, filling out a 10 question survey, clicking another link that will take you to a video, watching that video to get a secret code which you have to text to a sales rep, before finally receiving a calendar invite that you then accept via email before someone will call you in 5-10 business days– you’ll want to rethink things.

Is that sales process an exaggeration? Yes. But for many business owners, this inconvenient process isn’t that far from the actual reality of it.

Audit your checkout process

You want to find the balance between what information you need and what the customer wants to give. So before you go and rewrite your sales copy for the fifteenth time, look at your checkout process and yourself some questions.

How many steps and pages do you make your buyers dance through?  What is your abandoned cart rate? How can you streamline the steps? How can you get rid of any jarring steps or user frustrations?

All of these answers will increase your overall conversion rate and increase your sales as a result. It’s also a good idea to enlist the help of a fresh set of eyes to help you answer these questions. Find an outside consultant to look at your order flow and go through the process from start to finish to identify any areas that need polishing. 

Accessibility 

Creating a mobile-ready and visually appealing website is pretty standard these days. But many stop there in terms of accessibility. But there are many other areas to consider.

Can you increase the size of your font to make your sales copy easier to read? Do you have audio options for those with visual impairments? Is your website text-heavy and difficult for those with learning disabilities like Dyslexia to find what they need? What if a potential client doesn’t speak English as a first language and would rather read it in their native language?

All of these things will not only improve your customer experience but can also help increase your on-site conversions by tailoring the shopping experience to the end-user. You never want to lose a customer because they couldn’t find their reading glasses and lost interest before they purchased your product. 

At the end of the day, it’s all about helping your customer see the value and making it as easy as possible to do business with you.

The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

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